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A Dachshund Collage A Day with @acidinvader

To see more of David Carnie’s whimsical wiener dog works, follow @acidinvader on Instagram.

Before he became a prolific, semi-anonymous creator of dachshund-themed collages, David Carnie’s biggest claim to fame was coining the term “bromance” in the mid-90s. (“I’m sorry,” he says.) For the past year and a half, however, David has produced a dachshund collage nearly every single day under the pseudonym @acidinvader—an anagram of his name.

David began collaging as an exercise in creativity after receiving a daily dachshund calendar as a gift from his parents. “At the time, I had a soul-crushing job that was rendering me mentally bankrupt,” David says, “so I gave myself an assignment: make one piece of art every day for one year.” A year came and went, and he kept collaging.

“I like the random juxtapositions that collages create,” explains David. “That’s part of the ‘exercise’: letting go.” But that doesn’t mean his collages are completely devoid of deeper meaning: “There’s the occasional smarty-pants reference to literature, mythology, fairy tales or music.”

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Reality Bites With @wkass

To see more photos of William’s miniature worlds, follow @wkass on Instagram.

“Using everyday foods in my creations is my way to call attention to the waste in the world and society’s consumer culture,” says São Paulo architect-turned-photographer William Kass (@wkass). William uses raw food and toy figures from his old architecture models to create edible worlds. “What really excites me is photography’s ability to transform everyday foods into something so enormous and surreal,” he says. “I ask myself: ‘If fruits and vegetables were giant, would we put an end to world hunger? If human beings were the size of ants, would there be enough room for everyone on the planet?’ I believe the answer would still be no.”